Discussion:
Low fat milk products are associated with Parkinson's disease.
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Rejected Man
2017-06-08 19:04:15 UTC
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https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170607223327.htm

Low-fat dairy but not high-fat dairy is associated with Parkinson's disease.
Any proposed mechanisms?
On the face of it, this suggests the fat is protective.
Taka
2017-06-09 02:33:27 UTC
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Post by Rejected Man
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170607223327.htm
Low-fat dairy but not high-fat dairy is associated with Parkinson's disease.
Any proposed mechanisms?
On the face of it, this suggests the fat is protective.
They always grab the money and say "more research is needed"..... In some low fat milk products they remove the saturated fat completely and put back some amount of an Omega-6 rich vegetable oil or the "healthy" Omega-3 fats! Skimmed milk is highly oxidized including the oxysterols. And then yo get the devil's sugar galactose in it (a part of lactose)...
Taka
2017-06-09 02:37:19 UTC
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Post by Taka
And then yo get the devil's sugar galactose in it (a part of lactose)...
" fructose and galactose have approximately ten times the glycation activity of glucose, the primary body fuel."

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glycation

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10405984

Just google "galactose aging"!
Rejected Man
2017-06-17 20:16:43 UTC
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Post by Taka
Post by Taka
And then yo get the devil's sugar galactose in it (a part of lactose)...
" fructose and galactose have approximately ten times the glycation activity of glucose, the primary body fuel."
SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glycation
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10405984
Just google "galactose aging"!
Or just a PubMed search with 797 hits. Great point. Clearly, I was too focused on fructose.
Rejected Man
2017-06-17 20:13:23 UTC
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Post by Taka
Post by Rejected Man
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170607223327.htm
Low-fat dairy but not high-fat dairy is associated with Parkinson's disease.
Any proposed mechanisms?
On the face of it, this suggests the fat is protective.
They always grab the money and say "more research is needed"..... In some low fat milk products they remove the saturated fat completely and put back some amount of an Omega-6 rich vegetable oil or the "healthy" Omega-3 fats! Skimmed milk is highly oxidized including the oxysterols. And then yo get the devil's sugar galactose in it (a part of lactose)...
Now that I think about it, skim milk often contains a percentage of milk that has been dehydrated here in the States. Oxysterols could certainly place role.

Free Radic Biol Med. 2016 Dec;101:393-400. doi:
10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2016.10.008. Epub 2016 Nov 9.

Contribution of cholesterol and oxysterols to the pathophysiology of Parkinson's
disease.

Doria M(1), Maugest L(2), Moreau T(2), Lizard G(1), Vejux A(3).

Author information:
(snip)

Neurodegenerative diseases are a major public health issue worldwide. Some
countries, including France, have engaged in research into the causes of
Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and multiple sclerosis and the
management of these patients. It should lead to a better understanding of the
mechanisms leading to these diseases including the possible involvement of lipids
in their pathogenesis. Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative
disorder characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia
nigra and the accumulation of α-synuclein (Lewy bodies). Several in vivo studies
have shown a relationship between the lipid profile [cholesterol, oxidized
cholesterol products (oxysterols) formed either enzymatically or by
auto-oxidation], the use of drugs regulating cholesterol levels, and the
development of Parkinson's disease. Several oxysterols are present in the brain
and could play a role in the development of this disease, particularly in the
accumulation of α-synuclein, and through various side effects, such as oxidation,
inflammation, and cell death. Consequently, in Parkinson's disease, some
oxysterols could contribute to the pathophysiology of the disease and constitute
potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets.

(snip)

DOI: 10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2016.10.008
PMID: 27836779
b***@spamcop.net
2017-06-11 11:03:04 UTC
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Post by Rejected Man
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170607223327.htm
Low-fat dairy but not high-fat dairy is associated with Parkinson's disease.
Any proposed mechanisms?
On the face of it, this suggests the fat is protective.
Fat people eat low-fat dairy.
Fat, *inactive*, people are prone to a lot more than PD.

http://ed.ted.com/featured/Mot8KdLT

I explain why Asspartame consumption correlates with obesity the same
way: It sells to obese people. The remaining 60-80% of us don't worry
about it.

No, fat is not protective, except in how it helps in the absorption of
Vitamins D,E,A, and K.
Rejected Man
2017-06-17 20:23:37 UTC
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Post by b***@spamcop.net
Post by Rejected Man
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170607223327.htm
Low-fat dairy but not high-fat dairy is associated with Parkinson's disease.
Any proposed mechanisms?
On the face of it, this suggests the fat is protective.
Fat people eat low-fat dairy.
Fat, *inactive*, people are prone to a lot more than PD.
http://ed.ted.com/featured/Mot8KdLT
I explain why Asspartame consumption correlates with obesity the same
way: It sells to obese people. The remaining 60-80% of us don't worry
about it.
No, fat is not protective, except in how it helps in the absorption of
Vitamins D,E,A, and K.
I am skeptical that the simplest explanation is fully true. Personally, I avoid Aspartame. It is funny how the same people who avoid supplements will down these synthetic sweeteners without a pause. That said I throw out a B-12 supplement because of its synthetic sweetener content.
Taka
2017-06-18 02:25:44 UTC
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Post by Rejected Man
Post by b***@spamcop.net
Post by Rejected Man
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170607223327.htm
Low-fat dairy but not high-fat dairy is associated with Parkinson's disease.
Any proposed mechanisms?
On the face of it, this suggests the fat is protective.
Fat people eat low-fat dairy.
Fat, *inactive*, people are prone to a lot more than PD.
http://ed.ted.com/featured/Mot8KdLT
I explain why Asspartame consumption correlates with obesity the same
way: It sells to obese people. The remaining 60-80% of us don't worry
about it.
No, fat is not protective, except in how it helps in the absorption of
Vitamins D,E,A, and K.
I am skeptical that the simplest explanation is fully true. Personally, I avoid Aspartame. It is funny how the same people who avoid supplements will down these synthetic sweeteners without a pause. That said I throw out a B-12 supplement because of its synthetic sweetener content.
One of the worst things is also the formula milk - huge content of oxidized Omega-3 fatty acids but the infants can apparently deal with it as an acute exposure given their robust antioxidant defenses - not sure about the long term effects though!

http://pmid.us/17852396+9589432

Nicely summarized:
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mrgentox.2017.05.004

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