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Eat WALNUTS to avoid heart disease, cancer and dementia
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Taka
2017-07-29 03:14:53 UTC
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Just a small bag boosts anti-inflammatory gut bacteria

Just two ounces improve digestive health by helping prebiotic bugs to grow
Good intestinal bacteria is also linked to reduced arthritis, depression and aging
Louisiana State University conducted experiments on rats for 10 weeks
'The health of the gut is related to overall health' says professor involved in study

Eating a small bag of walnuts a day can reduce our risk of heart disease, cancer and dementia, according to new research.

Just two ounces – about 28 walnut halves, or a small bag – improve digestive health by nourishing friendly bacteria in the gut, helping them multiply.

The tasty nuts have been hailed a 'superfood' for years – but exactly why they are so good for us has been a mystery.

Now an industry-funded experiment on rats has shed light on the reason why – they promote the growth of good bacteria which have anti-inflammatory properties.

Chronic inflammation is now considered to be central – among other factors – to many illnesses including these three diseases.

Our microflora has also increasingly been linked to many aspects of health including aging, arthritis, depression, cancer and heart conditions.

Physiologist Professor Lauri Byerley, of Louisiana State University, said: 'The health of the gut is related to overall health in the rest of the body.

'Our study is showing walnuts change the gut, which could help explain why there are other positive health benefits to eating walnuts such as heart and brain health.'

Walnuts boost diversity

Professor Byerley said walnuts act as a prebiotic, which means it promotes the growth of beneficial bacteria that keeps the digestive system healthy.

The study, funded by the California Walnut Commission and American Institute for Cancer Research, found a diet with walnuts led to an overall significant increase in the diversity of microorganisms in the gut.

Professor Byerley explained: 'Gut health is an emerging research area, but we are seeing greater bacterial diversity may be associated with better health outcomes, whereas low diversity has been linked to conditions such as obesity and inflammatory bowel disease.'

How the research was carried out

The lab rodents were randomly given either a diet containing ground walnuts, equivalent to about two ounces a day in humans, or an alternative with a similar amount of nutrients and calories for up to ten weeks.

Rats that ate the walnut-enriched diet saw a rise in beneficial bacteria including lactobacillus, roseburia and ruminococcaceae.

Professor Byerley said walnuts are the only nut that contain a significant amount of omega-3 fatty acid – 2.5g an ounce. They also offer protein (4g) and fibre (2g).

She said more research is needed to understand how these outcomes translate to humans.

'Walnuts are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, phytochemicals and antioxidants making them unique compared to other foods,' she added.

'Consuming walnuts has been associated with health benefits including a reduced risk of heart disease and cancer.

'Several epidemiologic studies have linked eating tree nuts, such as walnuts, to living a longer, healthier life; however, the mechanism by which nuts impart this benefit has not been identified.

'Eating walnuts has been associated with a reduced the risk of cardiovascular disease in humans, slowing the rate of tumour growth in mice and maintaining brain health during aging.

'In summary, we show walnuts change the bacterial communities found in the descending colon.

'We propose that reshaping of the gut microbe community may play a physiological role in promoting walnut's health benefits and this needs further exploration.'

WALNUTS MAKE MEN MORE FERTILE

Men struggling to have children could boost their fertility by eating walnuts, a recent research claims.

Scientists say that eating a walnut-enriched diet may improve sperm quality.

The nut reduces lipid peroxidation, a process that can damage sperm cells, according to the study by the University of Delaware.

This form of cell damage harms sperm membranes, which are primarily made up of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

Walnuts are the only tree nut that are predominantly comprised of these fatty acids - meaning they are uniquely powerful for replenishing sperm cells.

Just one ounce of walnuts contains 13 grams of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), out of 18 grams of total fat.

SOURCE: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4738990/Walnut-staves-heart-disease-cancer-dementia.html
Taka
2017-07-29 03:20:07 UTC
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Post by Taka
lipid peroxidation, a process that can damage sperm cells, according to the study by the University of Delaware.
Just one ounce of walnuts contains 13 grams of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), out of 18 grams of total fat.
Going nuts over the walnuts, LOL ....
2017-08-04 07:28:16 UTC
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ScienceDaily
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Walnuts may promote health by changing gut bacteria
Date:
July 28, 2017
Source:
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center


Summary:
A new study has found that walnuts in the diet change the makeup of bacteria in the gut, which suggests a new way walnuts may contribute to better health.
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Walnuts.
Credit: © Tim UR / Fotolia
Research led by Lauri Byerley, PhD, RD, Research Associate Professor of Physiology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, has found that walnuts in the diet change the makeup of bacteria in the gut, which suggests a new way walnuts may contribute to better health. The findings are published in The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry available online.


"Walnuts have been called a 'superfood' because they are rich in the omega-3 fatty acid, alpha-linoleic acid and fiber, and they contain one of the highest concentrations of antioxidants," notes Dr. Byerley. "Now, an additional superfood benefit of walnuts may be their beneficial changes to the gut microbiota."

Working in a rodent model, the research team added walnuts to the diet of one group. The diet of the other group contained no walnuts. They then measured the types and numbers of gut bacteria in the descending colon and compared the results. They found that there were two distinct communities of bacteria in the groups. In the walnut-eating group, the numbers and types of bacteria changed, as did the bacteria's functional capacity. The researchers reported a significant increase in beneficial bacteria like Lactobacillus.

"We found that walnuts in the diet increased the diversity of bacteria in the gut, and other non-related studies have associated less bacterial diversity with obesity and other diseases like inflammatory bowel disease," says Byerley. "Walnuts increased several bacteria, like Lactobacillus, typically associated with probiotics suggesting walnuts may act as a prebiotic."

Prebiotics are dietary substances that selectively promote the numbers and activity of beneficial bacteria.

"Gut health is an emerging research area, and researchers are finding that greater bacterial diversity may be associated with better health outcomes," adds Byerley.

The researchers conclude that the reshaping of the gut microbe community by adding walnuts to the diet suggests a new physiological mechanism to improve health. Eating walnuts has been associated with reduced cardiovascular disease risk, slower tumor growth in animals and improved brain health.

The LSU Health New Orleans research team also included Drs. Derrick Samuelson, Eugene Blanchard, IV, Meng Luo, Sheila Banks, David Welsh, Brittany Lorenzen and Christopher Taylor, as well as Dr. Monica Ponder at Virginia Tech.

The research was supported by the American Institute for Cancer Research and California Walnut Commission.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference:

Lauri O. Byerley, Derrick Samuelson, Eugene Blanchard, Meng Luo, Brittany N. Lorenzen, Shelia Banks, Monica A. Ponder, David A Welsh, Christopher M. Taylor. Changes in the Gut Microbial Communities Following Addition of Walnuts to the Diet. The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, 2017; DOI: 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2017.07.001
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Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center. "Walnuts may promote health by changing gut bacteria." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 July 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/07/170728100832.htm>.


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https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/07/170728100832.htm
Taka
2017-08-04 17:23:02 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Taka
Post by Taka
lipid peroxidation, a process that can damage sperm cells, according to the study by the University of Delaware.
Just one ounce of walnuts contains 13 grams of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), out of 18 grams of total fat.
Going nuts over the walnuts, LOL ....
https://bluezones.com/2017/07/why-nuts-are-nutritional-powerhouse/
Taka
2017-08-04 17:26:29 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Taka
Post by Taka
lipid peroxidation, a process that can damage sperm cells, according to the study by the University of Delaware.
Just one ounce of walnuts contains 13 grams of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), out of 18 grams of total fat.
Going nuts over the walnuts, LOL ....
https://bluezones.com/2017/07/why-nuts-are-nutritional-powerhouse/
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